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Posts Tagged ‘coding’

Computational Geometry in Python

September 23, 2014 Leave a comment

To illustrate a few advantages of the scipy stack in one of my upcoming talks, I have placed an ipython notebook with (a reduced version of) the current draft of Chapter 6 (Computational Geometry) of my upcoming book: Mastering SciPy.

The raw ipynb can be downloaded from my github repository [blancosilva/Mastering-Scipy/], or viewed directly from the nbviewer at [this other link]

I also made a selection with some fun examples for the talk. You can download the presentation by clicking in the image above.

Enjoy!

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Jotto (5-letter Mastermind) in the NAO robot

July 9, 2014 Leave a comment

I would like to show how to code the NAO robot to beat us at Jotto (5-letter Mastermind) with python in Choregraphe. I will employ a brute force technique that does not require any knowledge of the English language, the frequency of its letters, or smart combinations of vowels and consonants to try to minimize the number of attempts. It goes like this:

  1. Gather all 5-letter words with no repeated letters in a list.
  2. Choose a random word from that list—your guess—, and ask it to be scored ala Mastermind.
  3. Filter through the list all words that share the same score with your guess; discard the rest.
  4. Go back to step 2 and repeat until the target word is found.

Coding this strategy in python requires only four variables:

  • whole_dict: the list with all the words
  • step = [x for x in whole_dict]: A copy of whole_dict, which is going to be shortened on each step (hence the name). Note that stating step = whole_dict will change the contents of whole_dict when we change the contents of step — not a good idea.
  • guess = random.choice(step): A random choice from the list step.
  • score: A string containing the two digits we obtain after scoring the guess. The first digit indicates the number of correct letters in the same position as the target word; the second digit indicates the number of correct letters in the wrong position.
  • attempts: optional. The number of attempts at guessing words. For quality control purposes.

At this point, I urge the reader to stop reading the post and try to implement this strategy as a simple script. When done, come back to see how it can be coded in the NAO robot.

Read more…

Robot stories

June 29, 2014 2 comments

Every summer before school was over, I was assigned a list of books to read. Mostly nonfiction and historical fiction, but in fourth grade there that was that first science fiction book. I often remember how that book made me feel, and marvel at the impact that it had in my life. I had read some science fiction before—Well’s Time Traveller and War of the Worlds—but this was different. This was a book with witty and thought-provoking short stories by Isaac Asimov. Each of them delivered drama, comedy, mystery and a surprise ending in about ten pages. And they had robots. And those robots had personalities, in spite of their very simple programming: The Three Laws of Robotics.

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Back in the 1980s, robotics—understood as autonomous mechanical thinking—was no more than a dream. A wonderful dream that fueled many children’s imaginations and probably shaped the career choices of some. I know in my case it did.

Fast forward some thirty-odd years, when I met Astro: one of three research robots manufactured by the French company Aldebaran. This NAO robot found its way into the computer science classroom of Tom Simpson in Heathwood Hall Episcopal School, and quickly learned to navigate mazes, recognize some student’s faces and names, and even dance the Macarena! It did so with effortless coding: a basic command of the computer language python, and some idea of object oriented programming.

I could not let this opportunity pass. I created a small undergraduate team with Danielle Talley from USC (a brilliant sophomore in computer engineering, with a minor in music), and two math majors from Morris College: my Geometry expert Fabian Maple, and a McGyver-style problem solver, Wesley Alexander. Wesley and Fabian are supported by a Department of Energy-Environmental Management grant to Morris College, which funds their summer research experience at USC. Danielle is funded by the National Science Foundation through the Louis Stokes South Carolina-Alliance for Minority Participation (LS-SCAMP).

They spent the best of their first week on this project completing a basic programming course online. At the same time, the four of us reviewed some of the mathematical tools needed to teach Astro new tricks: basic algebra and trigonometry, basic geometry, and basic calculus and statistics. The emphasis—I need to point out in case you missed it—is in the word basic.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3921/14343225109_6d4c70558e_d.jpg

Talk the talk

The psychologist seated herself and watched Herbie narrowly as he took a chair at the other side of the table and went through the three books systematically.

At the end of half an hour, he put them down, “Of course, I know why you brought these.”

The corner of Dr. Calvin’s lip twitched, “I was afraid you would. It’s difficult to work with you, Herbie. You’re always a step ahead of me.”

“It’s the same with these books, you know, as with the others. They just don’t interest me. There’s nothing to your textbooks. Your science is just a mass of collected data plastered together by makeshift theory — and all so incredibly simple, that it’s scarcely worth bothering about.”

“It’s your fiction that interests me. Your studies of the interplay of human motives and emotions” – his mighty hand gestured vaguely as he sought the proper words.

Liar!
— Isaac Asimov

Astro can understand what I say, and maintain conversations with me. He has four microphones for voice recognition and sound localization, and two speakers for text-to-speech synthesis. But he sometimes gets confused: I say “acute”, and he understands “abide,” for example. This might sound frustrating by all standards. But mathematicians can’t be judged by any reasonable standard. Far from seeing this as a shortcoming, my team used as motivation the mechanics behind his speech recognition functionality, and they wrote some code to turn him into an expert Mastermind player.

Wait, what? How are these two things possibly connected?

Since Astro’s hearing is far from perfect, when he hears a word which is not clear, he gathers a short list of possible candidates. He then chooses the most likely guess based upon different considerations—using clues from context, for example. Based on similar strategies, he can be taught to be a perfect player of 5-letter-word Mastermind: Pick any five-letter word in the English language. Any word, provided it has no repeated letters. Astro chooses one random word as his first guess, and requests a score like in Mastermind.

To illustrate this process, I will show you how the game went when I chose Fabian’s favorite word: “acute.”

Astro: Is it firth?
Me   : NO
Astro: How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the right position?
       How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the wrong position?
Me   : 1, 0
Astro: Is it foams?
Me   : NO
Astro: How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the right position?
       How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the wrong position?
Me   : 0, 1
Astro: Is it junta?
Me   : NO
Astro: How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the right position?
       How many letters of my guess are in your word, in the wrong position?
Me   : 1, 2
Astro: Is it acute?
Me   : YES
Astro: Wonderful, I found it in 4 attempts!

I don’t want to get too technical here, but will mention some of the ideas. The main algorithm is based on techniques of numerical root finding and solving nonlinear equations — nothing complex: high-school level bracketing by bisection, or Newton’s method. To design better winning strategies, my team exploits the benefits of randomness. The analysis of this part is done with basic probability and statistics.

Walk the walk

Donovan’s pencil pointed nervously. “The red cross is the selenium pool. You marked it yourself.”

“Which one is it?” interrupted Powell. “There were three that MacDougal located for us before he left.”

“I sent Speedy to the nearest, naturally; seventeen miles away. But what difference does that make?” There was tension in his voice. “There are penciled dots that mark Speedy’s position.”

And for the first time Powell’s artificial aplomb was shaken and his hands shot forward for the man.

“Are you serious? This is impossible.”

“There it is,” growled Donovan.

The little dots that marked the position formed a rough circle about the red cross of the selenium pool. And Powell’s fingers went to his brown mustache, the unfailing signal of anxiety.

Donovan added: “In the two hours I checked on him, he circled that damned pool four times. It seems likely to me that he’ll keep that up forever. Do you realize the position we’re in?”

Runaround
— Isaac Asimov

Astro moves around too. It does so thanks to a sophisticated system combining one accelerometer, one gyrometer and four ultrasonic sensors that provide him with stability and positioning within space. He also enjoys eight force-sensing resistors and two bumpers. And that is only for his legs! He can move his arms, bend his elbows, open and close his hands, or move his torso and neck (up to 25 degrees of freedom for the combination of all possible joints). Out of the box, and without much effort, he can be coded to walk around, although in a mechanical way: He moves forward a few feet, stops, rotates in place or steps to a side, etc. A very naïve way to go from A to B retrieving an object at C, could be easily coded in this fashion as the diagram shows:

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3884/14506683656_32784c832d_d.jpg

Fabian and Wesley devised a different way to code Astro taking full advantage of his inertial measurement unit. This will allow him to move around smoothly, almost like a human would. The key to their success? Polynomial interpolation and plane geometry. For advanced solutions, they need to learn about splines, curvature, and optimization. Nothing they can’t handle.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5595/14344128330_bb4845a89d_d.jpg

Sing me a song

He said he could manage three hours and Mortenson said that would be perfect when I gave him the news. We picked a night when she was going to be singing Bach or Handel or one of those old piano-bangers, and was going to have a long and impressive solo.

Mortenson went to the church that night and, of course, I went too. I felt responsible for what was going to happen and I thought I had better oversee the situation.

Mortenson said, gloomily, “I attended the rehearsals. She was just singing the same way she always did; you know, as though she had a tail and someone was stepping on it.”

One Night of Song
— Isaac Asimov

Astro has excellent eyesight and understanding of the world around him. He is equipped with two HD cameras, and a bunch of computer vision algorithms, including facial and shape recognition. Danielle’s dream is to have him read from a music sheet and sing or play the song in a toy piano. She is very close to completing this project: Astro is able now to identify partitures, and extract from them the location of the pentagrams. Danielle is currently working on identifying the notes and the clefs. This is one of her test images, and the result of one of her early experiments:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2906/14350961337_97bcb90e88_o_d.jpg https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3856/14537520835_4f0bf31eb1_d.jpg

Most of the techniques Danielle is using are accessible to any student with a decent command of vector calculus, and enough scientific maturity. The extraction of pentagrams and the different notes on them, for example, is performed with the Hough transform. This is a fancy term for an algorithm that basically searches for straight lines and circles by solving an optimization problem in two or three variables.

The only thing left is an actual performance. Danielle will be leading Fabian and Wes, and with the assistance of Mr. Simpson’s awesome students Erica and Robert, Astro will hopefully learn to physically approach the piano, choose the right keys, and play them in the correct order and speed. Talent show, anyone?

Project Euler with Julia

January 4, 2013 Leave a comment

Disclaimer: Project Euler discourages the posting of solutions to their problems, to avoid spoilers. The three solutions I have presented in my blog are to the three first problems (the easiest and most popular), as a means to advertise and encourage my readers to “push the envelope” and go beyond brute-force solutions.

Just for fun, and as a means to learn Julia, I will be attempting problems from the Project Euler coding exclusively in that promising computer language.

The first problem is very simple:

Multiples of 3 and 5
If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multip les is 23.

Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000.

One easy-to-code way is by dealing with arrays:

julia> sum( filter( x->((x%3==0) | (x%5==0)), [1:999] ) )
233168

A much better way is to obtain it via summation formulas: Note that the sum of all multiples of three between one and 999 is given by

3+6+\dotsb+999 = 3 (1+2+\dotsb+333) = 3 \frac{333\cdot 334}{2} = 166833.

Similarly, the sum of all multiples of five between one and 995 is given by

5+10+\dotsb+995 = 5 (1+2+\dotsb+199) = 5 \frac{199\cdot 200}{2} = 99500.

Finally, we need to subtract the sum of the multiples of both three and five, since they have been counted twice. This sum is

15+30+\dotsb+990 = 15 (1+2+\dotsb+66)= 15 \frac{66\cdot 67}{2}= 33165.

The final sum is then, 166833+99500-33165=233168.

Buy my book!

July 20, 2012 Leave a comment

Well, ok, it is not my book technically, but I am one of the authors of one of the chapters. And no, as far as I know, I don’t get a dime of the sales in concept of copyright or anything else.

As the title suggests (Modeling Nanoscale Imaging in Electron Microscopy), this book presents some recent advances that have been made using mathematical methods to resolve problems in electron microscopy. With improvements in hardware-based aberration software significantly expanding the nanoscale imaging capabilities of scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM), these mathematical models can replace some labor intensive procedures used to operate and maintain STEMs. This book, the first in its field since 1998, covers relevant concepts such as super-resolution techniques (that’s my contribution!), special de-noising methods, application of mathematical/statistical learning theory, and compressed sensing.

We even got a nice review in Physics Today by Les Allen, no less!

Imaging with electrons, in particular scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), is now in widespread use in the physical and biological sciences. And its importance will only grow as nanotechnology and nano-Biology continue to flourish. Many applications of electron microscopy are testing the limits of current imaging capabilities and highlight the need for further technological improvements. For example, high throughput in the combinatorial chemical synthesis of catalysts demands automated imaging. The handling of noisy data also calls for new approaches, particularly because low electron doses are used for sensitive samples such as biological and organic specimens.

Modeling Nanoscale Imaging in Electron Microscopy addresses all those issues and more. Edited by Thomas Vogt and Peter Binev at the University of South Carolina (USC) and Wolfgang Dahmen at RWTH Aachen University in Germany, the book came out of a series of workshops organized by the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute and the NanoCenter at USC. Those sessions took the unusual but innovative approach of bringing together electron microscopists, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, and even a philosopher to discuss new strategies for image analysis in electron microscopy.

In six chapters, the editors tackle the ambitious challenge of bridging the gap between high-level applied mathematics and experimental electron microscopy. They have met the challenge admirably. I believe that high-resolution electron microscopy is at a point where it will benefit considerably from an influx of new mathematical approaches, daunting as they may seem; in that regard Modeling Nanoscale Imaging in Electron Microscopy is a major step forward. Some sections present a level of mathematical sophistication seldom encountered in the experimentally focused electron-microscopy literature.
The first chapter, by philosopher of science Michael Dickson, looks at the big picture by raising the question of how we perceive nano-structures and suggesting that a Kantian approach would be fruitful. The book then moves into a review of the application of STEM to nanoscale systems, by Nigel Browning, a leading experimentalist in the field, and other well-known experts. Using case studies, the authors show how beam-sensitive samples can be studied with high spatial resolution, provided one controls the beam dose and establishes the experimental parameters that allow for the optimum dose.

The third chapter, written by image-processing experts Sarah Haigh and Angus Kirkland, addresses the reconstruction, from atomic-resolution images, of the wave at the exit surface of a specimen. The exit surface wave is a fundamental quantity containing not only amplitude (image) information but also phase information that is often intimately related to the atomic-level structure of the specimen. The next two chapters, by Binev and other experts, are based on work carried out using the experimental and computational resources available at USC. Examples in chapter four address the mathematical foundations of compressed sensing as applied to electron microscopy, and in particular high-angle annular dark-field STEM. That emerging approach uses randomness to extract the essential content from low-information signals. Chapter five eloquently discusses the efficacy of analyzing several low-dose images with specially adapted digital-image-processing techniques that allow one to keep the cumulative electron dose low and still achieve acceptable resolution.

The book concludes with a wide-ranging discussion by mathematicians Amit Singer and Yoel Shkolnisky on the reconstruction of a three-dimensional object via projected data taken at random and initially unknown object orientations. The discussion is an extension of the authors’ globally consistent angular reconstitution approach for recovering the structure of a macromolecule using cryo-electron microscopy. That work is also applicable to the new generation of x-ray free-electron lasers, which have similar prospective applications, and illustrates nicely the importance of applied mathematics in the physical sciences.

Modeling Nanoscale Imaging in Electron Microscopy will be an important resource for graduate students and researchers in the area of high-resolution electron microscopy.

(Les J. Allen, Physics Today, Vol. 65 (5), May, 2012)

Table of contents Preface Sample chapter

Naïve Bayes

June 21, 2012 Leave a comment

There is nothing naïve about Naïve Bayes—a very basic, but extremely efficient data mining method to take decisions when a vast amount of data is available. The name comes from the fact that this is the simplest application to this problem, upon (the naïve) assumption of independence of the events. It is based on Bayes’ rule of conditional probability: If you have a hypothesis H and evidence E that bears on that hypothesis, then

\mathrm{Pr} \big( H \lvert E \big) = \displaystyle{ \frac{\mathrm{Pr} \big( E \lvert H\big) \mathrm{Pr}(H)}{\mathrm{Pr}(E)} }

where as usual, \mathrm{Pr}(A) denotes the probability of the event A, and \mathrm{Pr}\big( A \lvert B \big) denotes the probability of the event A conditional to another event B.

I would like to show an example of this technique, of course, with yet another decision-making algorithm oriented to guess my reaction to a movie I have not seen before. From the data obtained in a previous post, I create a simpler table with only those movies that have been scored more than 28 times (by a pool of 87 of the most popular critics featured in www.metacritics.com) [I posted the script to create that table at the end of the post]

Let’s test it:

>>> table=prepTable(scoredMovies,28)
>>> len(table)

49
>>> [entry[0] for entry in table]

[‘rabbit-hole’, ‘carnage-2011’, ‘star-wars-episode-iii—revenge-of-the-sith’,
‘shame’, ‘brokeback-mountain’, ‘drive’, ‘sideways’, ‘salt’,
‘million-dollar-baby’, ‘a-separation’, ‘dark-shadows’,
‘the-lord-of-the-rings-the-return-of-the-king’, ‘true-grit’, ‘inception’,
‘hereafter’, ‘master-and-commander-the-far-side-of-the-world’, ‘batman-begins’,
‘harry-potter-and-the-deathly-hallows-part-2’, ‘the-artist’, ‘the-fighter’,
‘larry-crowne’, ‘the-hunger-games’, ‘the-descendants’, ‘midnight-in-paris’,
‘moneyball’, ‘8-mile’, ‘the-departed’, ‘war-horse’,
‘the-lord-of-the-rings-the-fellowship-of-the-ring’, ‘j-edgar’,
‘the-kings-speech’, ‘super-8’, ‘robin-hood’, ‘american-splendor’, ‘hugo’,
‘eternal-sunshine-of-the-spotless-mind’, ‘the-lovely-bones’, ‘the-tree-of-life’,
‘the-pianist’, ‘the-ides-of-march’, ‘the-quiet-american’, ‘alexander’,
‘lost-in-translation’, ‘seabiscuit’, ‘catch-me-if-you-can’, ‘the-avengers-2012’,
‘the-social-network’, ‘closer’, ‘the-girl-with-the-dragon-tattoo-2011’]
>>> table[0]

[‘rabbit-hole’, ”, ‘B+’, ‘B’, ”, ‘C’, ‘C+’, ”, ‘F’, ‘B+’, ‘F’, ‘C’, ‘F’, ‘D’,
”, ”, ‘A’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘B+’, ‘C+’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘C+’, ”, ”,
”, ”, ”, ”, ‘A’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘A’, ”, ”, ‘B+’, ‘B+’, ‘B’, ”, ”,
”, ‘D’, ‘B+’, ”, ”, ‘C+’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘B+’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”,
”, ‘A’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘D’, ”, ”,’C+’, ‘A’, ”, ”, ”, ‘C+’, ”]

Read more…

Math still not the answer

May 16, 2012 1 comment

I wrote a quick (but not very elegant) python script to retrieve locally enough data from www.metacritic.com for pattern recognition purposes. The main goal is to help me decide how much I will enjoy a movie, before watching it. I included the script at the end of the post, in case you want to try it yourself (and maybe improve it too!). It takes a while to complete, although it is quite entertaining to see its progress on screen. At the end, it provides with two lists of the same length: critics—a list of str containing the names of the critics; and scoredMovies—a list of dict containing, at index k, the evaluation of all the movies scored by the critic at index k in the previous list.

For example:

>>> critics[43]

‘James White’
>>> scoredMovies[43]

{‘hall-pass’: 60, ‘the-karate-kid’: 60, ‘the-losers’: 60,
‘the-avengers-2012’: 80, ‘the-other-guys’: 60, ‘shrek-forever-after’: 80,
‘the-lincoln-lawyer’: 80, ‘the-company-men’: 60, ‘jonah-hex’: 40,
‘arthur’: 60, ‘vampires-suck’: 20, ‘american-reunion’: 40,
‘footloose’: 60, ‘real-steel’: 60}

The number of scored films by critic varies: there are individuals that gave their opinion on a few dozen movies, and others that took the trouble to evaluate up to four thousand flicks! Note also that the names of the movies correspond with their web pages in www.metacritic.com. For example, to see what critics have to say about the “Karate Kid” and other relevant information online, point your browser to www.metacritic.com/movie/the-karate-kid. It also comes in very handy if there are several versions of a single title: Which “Karate Kid” does this score refer to, the one in the eighties, or Jackie Chan’s?

Feel free to download a copy of the resulting data [here] (note it is a large file: 1.6MB).

But the fact that we have that data stored locally allows us to gather that information with simple python commands, and perform many complex operations on it.

Read more…

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